Thursday, September 13, 2012

An Enthusiast's Classic Motorcycle Barn-Museum


Expert Author Darnell A
During early 70's, I was in search of JD parts to an old 1924 H-D basket case I had picked up low priced in an AMC meet in Schenectady, in the big apple. After much searching, I discovered Bill's Custom Cycles in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. A call confirmed they had many of the components I'd been trying to find, so I took my mother's car, grabbed my buddy Ricky Politi, and off we went to rural Pennsylvania on the hunt for a biker's gold! Found in a block building somewhere near the highway, I felt hesitant of what to expect from the shop. As I went in, the building opened up into a large room, the angels started to come down singing, and bright light flashed and focused in one spot from the heavens. I realized that I was indeed in the correct place.
I found showcases stuffed with old saved motors, NOS Harley components in those wonderful black and orange bins, an alcove of good old riding hats, and a protracted, L-shaped counter with shelves filled with stuff behind it. Dispersed over the big space were refurbished Barleys of each and every design: Knuckleheads, Panheads, 45s, a ServiCar, a few Indians. Where ever you look and it was certainly there. Bill Morris, the owner, specialized in buying classic Harley Davidson vendors that have gone out of business. Bill's shop was loaded with NOS components coming from all eras. Bill also specialized in purchasing a lot of other stuff and would likely buy out anything classic that he preferred; his catalogue expanded to huge proportions!
In the late 90's, he asked himself, what's the use of all this stuff if you couldn't feel it, see it, enjoy it, touch it, and easily share it with others? Hence, he started work on what would develop into the first part of his improving museum, identified as Bill's Old Bike Barn. He used a complete barn he decided to buy and reassembled the interior of the building to house the exhibits, and it appears great as a backdrop where they would present his collection. He stocked the barn which has a huge cross section of bikes and bike collectible items.
Bill discovered that the museum was great for people who definitely are into motorcycles and automobiles, but Bill needed to exhibit something for everybody to ensure the museum generally is a destination for not just bike and automobile enthusiasts but for families too. Bill added a couple more buildings, now totaling 45,000 sq/ft. and filled them with a bunch of other collectible merchandise to fascinate even the most discerning antique enthusiasts.
He prepared an enormous collection of antiques in a series of shops that look like a little town called Billville, which includes anything from a 1939 World's Fair bar, to an office pf the mayor, to a post office and anything in between! The museum is totally awesome, so take the whole family with you, and plan on spending a day to take it all in. Certainly, there is something for everyone.
Before heading out, when swapping anything on your bike from side mirrors, grips, fenders, Z bars, rims, or anything, make sure they are made from the toughest and highest quality materials to ensure your safety. We get one shot at life, so drive safely and happy biking!
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Darnell_A

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